Outdoor Furniture Plans

Over 100 Free Outdoor Woodcraft Plans at AllCrafts.net Free plans for all kinds of outdoor woodworking projects. Arbors, chairs, patio furniture, benches, gardening tables, outdoor storage and much more!outdoor furniture plans 1Welcome to Absolutely Free Plans, in the Outdoor Projects section you will find free plans to build anything found outdoors around the home such as deck chairs, benches, planters and picnic tables. BIrd houses and dog houses are well represented along with a few wishing well plans.outdoor furniture plans 2One of the driving factors in how I design a furniture plan is I imagine myself building it. It’s not about just throwing up a plan.  I actually think, if I were building this, how can I make it cheaper, easier, how can you be more successful?  You would be surprised at how many plans don’t make it to Knock-Off Wood because I don’t feel “good” about posting it. Take three, I think I’ve finally got it. And when you redo a plan three times because you are not completely satisfied with it, well, you end up organizing your sketchup file better, and that ends up with an easy to do video.  Make sure you watch the video, it’ll all make sense! If you can’t get the video to load, you can click here to see it.  I promise, it’s worth your time if you are curious how this chair goes together! A couple of other items I wanted to be sure I covered when this chair was built:  I wanted you to be able to go to Target and buy cushions that fit, if you wanted to.  This chair will fit a standard cushion sized at 20″ x 20″.  I wanted you to be able to build this in a loveseat size.  And a couch size.  Expect these plans soon (if I get good response to this plan). For inspiration, I looked to the West Elm Wood Slat Armchair and the Nantucket Collection from Restoration hardware, but as you may have noticed, Knock-Off Wood is becoming much less of a knock-off and more of a inspired handmade site, so this chair is not an exact replica.   Because to replicate either of those chairs, I would be forcing you to buy very expensive cushions, and my intention is to keep your options open, not limit them.outdoor furniture plans 3Most Popular Author Copy Created with Sketch. By Neal Barrett Sep 18, 2015 It’s a good thing that so many plastic patio chairs are designed to stack, and the aluminum ones fold up flat. That means we can get them put away and stored out of sight as quickly as possible. But, if you think outdoor furniture should enhance your yard and garden, consider a chair that evolved on the porches of summer homes and resorts of upstate New York. It’s an object that no one will want to hide, because it simply looks so good: the Adirondack chair.Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowOur version has come a long way from the early types that had flat backs and seats — and, we’ve added a matching table so you’ll have a stylish surface for cool drinks and a good book. Although there are a few angles and curves to cut, there’s no fancy joinery — everything’s held together with corrosion-resistant deck screws. We used cedar for these pieces because it stands up well to the elements, and it’s available in the required 3/4- and 1-in. thicknesses. You could substitute pine if you plan to keep the pieces out of the weather. Most PopularIf you’re building more than one chair, it pays to make templates for parts like the side rails, arms and back rails. The patterns also will come in handy when your friends see your work and ask you to make chairs for them.Model designed in Alibre Design Xpress. Get your FREE copy today!View a larger version of this animationorDownload printable plans of the Adirondack chair and table.(Requires Adobe Reader).MATERIALS LISTQTY.SIZEDESCRIPTIONA21 x 5-1/4 x 33-3/4″cedar side railB11 x 4-1/4 x 23-1/4″cedar top back railC11 x 3-1/2 x 23-1/4″cedar bottom back railD93/4 x 2-1/4 x 23-1/4″cedar seat slatE73/4 x 3-1/4 x 35-1/2″cedar back slatF21 x 4-1/4 x 20-1/2″cedar front legG21 x 2-1/2 x 29″cedar back legH21 x 2-3/4 x 6-1/2″cedar arm bracketI21 x 5-1/4 x 28″cedar armJ21 x 5-1/4 x 16″cedar footK21 x 1-1/2 x 19-1/4″cedar cleatL21 x 5 x 16-1/2″cedar legM23/4 x 5 x 17-1/2″cedar stretcherN51 x 3-3/4 x 24″cedar slatOas required1-5/8″ No. 8fh deck screwPas required2″ No. 8fh deck screwMaking the Chair SeatLay out the side-rail shape on your stock, cut to the lines with a jigsaw and sand the edges smooth. Then, cut the back rails to size, and saw the curves that give the chair back its concave shape. Note that the cut on the top rail is square, while the bottom rail has a 7-degree bevel. Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowCut the seat slats to size and round the upper edges of each with a 1/4-in. quarter-round bit in a router table. Then, round the exposed edges — those that won’t abut other parts — of the side and back rails. Keep the router table set up for this job so you can round the edges of the other parts as they’re made.Because of the shape of the seat, most of the slats require bevels on one or both edges. Use a table saw or hand plane to cut the bevels.Start seat assembly by screwing the lower back rail to the seat sides with one screw at each end of the rail. Then, add slat No. 4 as indicated in the drawing, again using only one screw at each end . Measure opposite diagonals of the subassembly and adjust it until it’s square. When you’re satisfied, add a second screw to each end of the two slats to lock the pieces in position. Use a 1-in.-thick block as a spacer to position the rear seat slat . Then install the remaining slats. Because the seat is curved and many of the slat edges are angled, don’t try to measure these spaces. Instead, simply arrange the slats by eye so that they appear uniform. Advertisement – Continue Reading Belowoutdoor furniture plans 4Author Copy Created with Sketch. By Neal Barrett Sep 18, 2015 It’s a good thing that so many plastic patio chairs are designed to stack, and the aluminum ones fold up flat. That means we can get them put away and stored out of sight as quickly as possible. But, if you think outdoor furniture should enhance your yard and garden, consider a chair that evolved on the porches of summer homes and resorts of upstate New York. It’s an object that no one will want to hide, because it simply looks so good: the Adirondack chair.Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowOur version has come a long way from the early types that had flat backs and seats — and, we’ve added a matching table so you’ll have a stylish surface for cool drinks and a good book. Although there are a few angles and curves to cut, there’s no fancy joinery — everything’s held together with corrosion-resistant deck screws. We used cedar for these pieces because it stands up well to the elements, and it’s available in the required 3/4- and 1-in. thicknesses. You could substitute pine if you plan to keep the pieces out of the weather. Most PopularIf you’re building more than one chair, it pays to make templates for parts like the side rails, arms and back rails. The patterns also will come in handy when your friends see your work and ask you to make chairs for them.Model designed in Alibre Design Xpress. Get your FREE copy today!View a larger version of this animationorDownload printable plans of the Adirondack chair and table.(Requires Adobe Reader).MATERIALS LISTQTY.SIZEDESCRIPTIONA21 x 5-1/4 x 33-3/4″cedar side railB11 x 4-1/4 x 23-1/4″cedar top back railC11 x 3-1/2 x 23-1/4″cedar bottom back railD93/4 x 2-1/4 x 23-1/4″cedar seat slatE73/4 x 3-1/4 x 35-1/2″cedar back slatF21 x 4-1/4 x 20-1/2″cedar front legG21 x 2-1/2 x 29″cedar back legH21 x 2-3/4 x 6-1/2″cedar arm bracketI21 x 5-1/4 x 28″cedar armJ21 x 5-1/4 x 16″cedar footK21 x 1-1/2 x 19-1/4″cedar cleatL21 x 5 x 16-1/2″cedar legM23/4 x 5 x 17-1/2″cedar stretcherN51 x 3-3/4 x 24″cedar slatOas required1-5/8″ No. 8fh deck screwPas required2″ No. 8fh deck screwMaking the Chair SeatLay out the side-rail shape on your stock, cut to the lines with a jigsaw and sand the edges smooth. Then, cut the back rails to size, and saw the curves that give the chair back its concave shape. Note that the cut on the top rail is square, while the bottom rail has a 7-degree bevel. Advertisement – Continue Reading BelowCut the seat slats to size and round the upper edges of each with a 1/4-in. quarter-round bit in a router table. Then, round the exposed edges — those that won’t abut other parts — of the side and back rails. Keep the router table set up for this job so you can round the edges of the other parts as they’re made.Because of the shape of the seat, most of the slats require bevels on one or both edges. Use a table saw or hand plane to cut the bevels.Start seat assembly by screwing the lower back rail to the seat sides with one screw at each end of the rail. Then, add slat No. 4 as indicated in the drawing, again using only one screw at each end . Measure opposite diagonals of the subassembly and adjust it until it’s square. When you’re satisfied, add a second screw to each end of the two slats to lock the pieces in position. Use a 1-in.-thick block as a spacer to position the rear seat slat . Then install the remaining slats. Because the seat is curved and many of the slat edges are angled, don’t try to measure these spaces. Instead, simply arrange the slats by eye so that they appear uniform. Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

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