Glazing Kitchen Cabinets

Before applying glaze, make sure that the cream base coat is completely dry, which typically takes 24 hours. While you can mix your own glaze, it’s usually easier to use a pre-mixed glazing product from your paint supply store. Glaze comes in a variety of colors, so choose an option that complements the rest of your kitchen’s decor. For cabinets, opt for an oil-based glaze product because you’ll have more time to work since it takes longer to dry than a water-based formula. You can use a brush or clean rag for your initial glaze application, but work in a either a circular or straight motion as you apply it. Once you coat the cabinets with glaze, take a clean rag and use it to wipe off the glaze so the cabinets are only lightly tinted. It may help to start on the back of your cabinet doors, so if you make a mistake as you perfect your glazing technique, it won’t be as obvious. Glaze the doors first before moving on to the drawers. Leave the cabinet bases for last. If you do the back of the cabinet doors, you’ll have to wait for them to dry fully before moving on to the cabinet fronts.glazing kitchen cabinets 1Glaze Before applying glaze, make sure that the cream base coat is completely dry, which typically takes 24 hours. While you can mix your own glaze, it’s usually easier to use a pre-mixed glazing product from your paint supply store. Glaze comes in a variety of colors, so choose an option that complements the rest of your kitchen’s decor. For cabinets, opt for an oil-based glaze product because you’ll have more time to work since it takes longer to dry than a water-based formula. You can use a brush or clean rag for your initial glaze application, but work in a either a circular or straight motion as you apply it. Once you coat the cabinets with glaze, take a clean rag and use it to wipe off the glaze so the cabinets are only lightly tinted. It may help to start on the back of your cabinet doors, so if you make a mistake as you perfect your glazing technique, it won’t be as obvious. Glaze the doors first before moving on to the drawers. Leave the cabinet bases for last. If you do the back of the cabinet doors, you’ll have to wait for them to dry fully before moving on to the cabinet fronts.glazing kitchen cabinets 2What is Cabinet Glazing? What is most commonly referred to as “cabinet glazing” is adding a second color to accentuate the architectural details of the cabinets. This can also be referred to as “pin-striping”. See the brown color in the grooves of the cabinets below? That’s glaze. You can do a single line of glaze, a double line of glaze and up to as many lines as there are grooves in the cabinets for a high impact and contrasting look. In this example, we did 5 lines of glaze. The price goes up a little with each line of glaze because that is one more pass over each cabinet surface. We glaze every single surface by hand.glazing kitchen cabinets 3Are you thinking of having your kitchen cabinets painted? If so, there are lots of decisions to make as a homeowner concerning the new look of your kitchen. Before I ever meet a client on site to make suggestions for their cabinets, I try to get a little information on what kind of look they want for their kitchen. One of the things I always ask is if they want their cabinets glazed. Most people answer with, “I have no idea what you are talking about, can I see examples?” So, I thought it would be helpful to explain and illustrate kitchen cabinet glazing.glazing kitchen cabinets 4The glazing process will be the second step after you have finished painting the cabinets. Once the cabinets are completely dry and the paint is cured you can start the glaze process.  Please note, I can only recommend glazing over latex based paint because that is where I have had the best success. Should still work over oil based paints but not over chalk paint that is unsealed. Also, the glaze works best on eggshell or satin finish. If you use flat paint the glaze will not be easily workable. It will stick more like stain and that is not good. If the paint too glossy the glaze will glide off too much.glazing kitchen cabinets 5Glazing/ antiquing cabinets. A complete how to guide from a professional. A faux finisher shows you how to glaze cabinets like a pro! Start with your basic white cabinets, or start from scratch with dated wood cabinets. Glaze in any color, on any color! Adds lots of definition to otherwise boring cabinets. Theraggedwren.blogspot.comglazing kitchen cabinets 6For a cleaner looking cabinet door, when it is about glazing cabinets make sure you don’t glaze the back side of the doors. You can use a tape to keep it off at the back. Also a sponge applicator can be use to apply the glazing, it simply makes the work easier. All you need to do is dip the sponge and start with the profiles first, moving ahead with the flat surface. Remember, you don’t need to glaze the entire door at one time. Prefer carrying out in small sections at a time.glazing kitchen cabinets 7Prep Cabinets Before you refinish your cabinets with cream paint and glaze, you must prepare them properly. Start by removing the cabinet doors, drawers and hardware. In a kitchen, cabinets usually have smoke, oil and other residue on their surface that may not be visible to the eye, so you must thoroughly clean them with a degreasing cleanser. Follow up with a deglosser, which will remove any lingering greasy residue. Once the cabinets are clean and dry, use 100- to 220-grit sandpaper to sand the surface so the cabinets will accept the paint more easily. For the best results, apply a primer before painting. If your cabinets are made from a tight-grained wood like cherry or maple, an oil-based primer works best. However, for cabinets made with an open-grained wood like ash, oak, hickory or mahogany, a brushing putty is a better option because its thick consistency allows it to fill the grain and prime the wood at the same time.glazing kitchen cabinets 8To glaze or not to glaze? Typically speaking, glazing is a more traditional look. If you are looking for something more modern, you might want to skip the glaze. Photos illustrating both looks below. Glazed kitchen cabinets White kitchen cabinets without glazeglazing kitchen cabinets 9Typically speaking, glazing is a more traditional look. If you are looking for something more modern, you might want to skip the glaze. Photos illustrating both looks below. Glazed kitchen cabinets White kitchen cabinets without glazeglazing kitchen cabinets 10Before you refinish your cabinets with cream paint and glaze, you must prepare them properly. Start by removing the cabinet doors, drawers and hardware. In a kitchen, cabinets usually have smoke, oil and other residue on their surface that may not be visible to the eye, so you must thoroughly clean them with a degreasing cleanser. Follow up with a deglosser, which will remove any lingering greasy residue. Once the cabinets are clean and dry, use 100- to 220-grit sandpaper to sand the surface so the cabinets will accept the paint more easily. For the best results, apply a primer before painting. If your cabinets are made from a tight-grained wood like cherry or maple, an oil-based primer works best. However, for cabinets made with an open-grained wood like ash, oak, hickory or mahogany, a brushing putty is a better option because its thick consistency allows it to fill the grain and prime the wood at the same time.glazing kitchen cabinets 11What is most commonly referred to as “cabinet glazing” is adding a second color to accentuate the architectural details of the cabinets. This can also be referred to as “pin-striping”. See the brown color in the grooves of the cabinets below? That’s glaze. You can do a single line of glaze, a double line of glaze and up to as many lines as there are grooves in the cabinets for a high impact and contrasting look. In this example, we did 5 lines of glaze. The price goes up a little with each line of glaze because that is one more pass over each cabinet surface. We glaze every single surface by hand.glazing kitchen cabinets 12Glazing won't really work over a dark color like black. You could do a lighter color wash, or do a distressed finish instead. Waxing and sanding is the finish I do with black paints on cabinets. Try using it just on an island, and bringing in another color for the rest of the cabinets.glazing kitchen cabinets 13Here are a few before and afters, so you can see what a difference it makes. These cabinets were already painted before I came in. They were just a stark basic white, and the walls around were a glazed stucco plaster look. The cabinets just stuck out like a sore thumb. This glazing technique, helps tone them down, and warm up the space.

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