Build An Outdoor Kitchen

1. Don’t forget an insulated grill jacket when using combustible materials. So many outdoor kitchens have gone down in flames because an insulated grill jacket was not installed with the grill. While insulated jackets are not the most glamorous item to think about having in your outdoor kitchen, it is an absolute necessity when building your outdoor kitchen with any combustible materials (treated or not). Insulated grill jackets surround your grill, keeping your outdoor kitchen structure cool, preventing any burning or warping. Also, insulated grill jackets support and protect your grills undercarriage from weathering and corrosion, which will help it last longer. Don’t put your beautiful new outdoor kitchen (along with your home and property) at risk. Installing an insulated grill jacket will ensure your outdoor kitchen remains protected and will last for many years of cookouts. Note: Not all brands offer insulated grill jackets for their grills. If you need an insulated grill jacket, make sure you purchase your grill from a brand that offers one. Shop All Insulated Grill Jacketsbuild an outdoor kitchen 14. Enclosed storage components may not work under a sink or grill. While it’s always convenient to have cabinets, doors and drawers installed throughout your outdoor kitchen, always consider the placement of your storage components when deciding whether or not to buy enclosed cabinets. Many outdoor kitchen owners have purchased enclosed cabinetry to place under their sink, only to later realize they did not account for the plumbing. This is also a common issue with grills, as the gas lines are not considered come installation time. When planning your outdoor kitchen, decide on the placement of your doors and drawers, and whether or not you can install a cabinet, or if you will have to use access doors that open into the existing island structure. Shop All Outdoor Kitchen Storagebuild an outdoor kitchen 27. Don’t forget to leave usable counter space. Of course you want to deck out your new outdoor kitchen with all sorts of appliances, allowing you a ton of versatility for cooking and entertaining. However, in all the excitement of designing a dream kitchen, many people forget the importance of leaving counter space. Depending on how you will be using your outdoor kitchen, it is important to leave enough counter space for things like preparing food, serving, eating and entertaining. When designing your outdoor kitchen, make sure you leave enough workable space for easy and convenient outdoor cooking.build an outdoor kitchen 3Kitchens are the undisputed heart of the home, where everyone gathers, mingles, and lingers during parties. But to achieve that kind of appeal outside means expanding your outdoor living space. To draw a crowd—and keep them entertained—requires a bit more than plopping down a table and a few plastic chairs. With an outdoor kitchen you can prepare meals and be around your guests with minimal time spent running back inside for plates, beverages, or tongs. Although you could spend tens of thousands of dollars for a custom outdoor kitchen, a basic island is an efficient design that leaves out the complexity of curves and angles. Not only that, with an island guests can relax on one side while you’re cooking on the other, so you feel as though you’re part of the gathering. Since durability is such a critical issue for an outdoor kitchen, stone veneer is a low-maintenance option that won’t need painting or sealing. Real stone is heavy, expensive, and requires the experience of a mason. Cementitious cultured stone, such as the type used in this project from Landmark Stone, is easier to work with because it’s lighter, cuts faster, and lasts just as long as the real thing—all while looking as natural as real stone. Follow along as This Old House senior technical editor Mark Powers builds a simple frame, covers it in faux stone, and then nestles a gas grill in the center to get the party started.build an outdoor kitchen 4This is and Awesome post, thanks and Building an Outdoor Kitchen with steel studs and cement board is the best way for homeowners to diy and save a lot of money. Always screw the studs and track together and do not weld, as exterior steel studs are galvanized and the fumes will make you very sick without proper protection. Make sure your steel studs are rated for exterior and structural use and do not use the thin 25 gauge designed for interior use only. Consider using frame kits like the bbq coach system that has easy to use pro panels and step by step videos that help homeowners create outdoor kitchens with amazing results. Most of all have fun building your new outdoor kitchen. WillieWho are the companies making this concrete slabs. Is it possible to get the names?Nice instructable. I'm in the planning stages of my outdoor kitchen.What would those concrete panel systems be called? I'm not having a lot of luck finding them.Hi!Technically there is a danger of course. This depends on exact clearances but the BBQ can potentially dry out the wood to the point that it falls apart or even catches fire. Can you use Durock board in between?best regards,Eugene.is there a danger using acq lumber for a built in bbq frame. and is there a heat problem having a built in bbq us against a synthetic deckVery, very nice. I'm so jealous. Thanks for sharing.More Commentsbuild an outdoor kitchen 5This is and Awesome post, thanks and Building an Outdoor Kitchen with steel studs and cement board is the best way for homeowners to diy and save a lot of money. Always screw the studs and track together and do not weld, as exterior steel studs are galvanized and the fumes will make you very sick without proper protection. Make sure your steel studs are rated for exterior and structural use and do not use the thin 25 gauge designed for interior use only. Consider using frame kits like the bbq coach system that has easy to use pro panels and step by step videos that help homeowners create outdoor kitchens with amazing results. Most of all have fun building your new outdoor kitchen. WillieWho are the companies making this concrete slabs. Is it possible to get the names?Nice instructable. I'm in the planning stages of my outdoor kitchen.What would those concrete panel systems be called? I'm not having a lot of luck finding them.Hi!Technically there is a danger of course. This depends on exact clearances but the BBQ can potentially dry out the wood to the point that it falls apart or even catches fire. Can you use Durock board in between?best regards,Eugene.is there a danger using acq lumber for a built in bbq frame. and is there a heat problem having a built in bbq us against a synthetic deckVery, very nice. I'm so jealous. Thanks for sharing.build an outdoor kitchen 6How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Shopping List 1. Cultured stone to veneer the kitchen box. Available at home centers and stone yards. You will need a few boxes of corner pieces, as well as flat face pieces, sold by the square foot. Get about 10 percent more than you need to account for trims, cuts, and broken pieces. 2. Pressure-treated 2x4s to build the frame for the box. You will need 15 to 20 10-foot pieces. 3. 3/4-inch pressure-treated plywood to sheathe the frame. Get four 8-by-4-foot sheets. 4. 2½-inch ceramic-coated deck screws to hold the frame together. 5. 2-inch ceramic coated deck screws to attach the plywood to the frame. 1¼-inch ceramic coated deck screws to build plywood boxes for the cabinets. 6. Construction adhesive.7. Metal post standoffs to act as feet and raise the frame off the ground, preventing moisture from wicking up into the wood. You will need a total of 12. 8. 15-pound builder’s felt to provide a moisture barrier between the mortar and the wood. 9. ½-inch staples 10. Wire lath to create a base on which the mortar hangs. 11. Stainless-steel roofing nails to attach the lath to the plywood. 12. Type S mortar (or one labeled “for veneer stone”) to affix the stone to the box. Get four or five 80-pound bags. 13. Stainless-steel doors (optional) to finish cabinets. Make sure they come on a face frame. ×build an outdoor kitchen 7How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Shopping List 1. Cultured stone to veneer the kitchen box. Available at home centers and stone yards. You will need a few boxes of corner pieces, as well as flat face pieces, sold by the square foot. Get about 10 percent more than you need to account for trims, cuts, and broken pieces. 2. Pressure-treated 2x4s to build the frame for the box. You will need 15 to 20 10-foot pieces. 3. 3/4-inch pressure-treated plywood to sheathe the frame. Get four 8-by-4-foot sheets. 4. 2½-inch ceramic-coated deck screws to hold the frame together. 5. 2-inch ceramic coated deck screws to attach the plywood to the frame. 1¼-inch ceramic coated deck screws to build plywood boxes for the cabinets. 6. Construction adhesive.7. Metal post standoffs to act as feet and raise the frame off the ground, preventing moisture from wicking up into the wood. You will need a total of 12. 8. 15-pound builder’s felt to provide a moisture barrier between the mortar and the wood. 9. ½-inch staples 10. Wire lath to create a base on which the mortar hangs. 11. Stainless-steel roofing nails to attach the lath to the plywood. 12. Type S mortar (or one labeled “for veneer stone”) to affix the stone to the box. Get four or five 80-pound bags. 13. Stainless-steel doors (optional) to finish cabinets. Make sure they come on a face frame.

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